The Brew back in Britain

The Brew
The Brew

The Brew will headline at the Komedia in Brighton on January 25 as they continue in their bid to conquer their own country.

Hailing from the north-eastern fishing town of Grimsby, The Brew have gained a reputation as one of the most exciting live rock acts in Europe, with five chart-topping albums to their credit.

Now they are wanting to bring some of that success back to their home country.

Tim Smith, who plays bass, said: “We don’t actually play that often here in the UK. The band has built its reputation in Europe, mainly in Germany.

“All the great rock bands, past and present, are still making their living in Europe. They just love live music there, especially in Germany, and I think really the British have lost that. I remember back in the late 70s and early 80s, people would be desperate to get out and see the new bands that were coming through and to see the bands that were going to make it big.

“But these days really it is apathy that rules. I think certainly the younger people tend to wait now until the bands get a higher profile and are recognised before they actually go and see them. For the newer bands, they are happy just to catch them on YouTube.

“Maybe it’s down to cost. It’s easier just to check bands out online these days. They have lost that urge to get out and actually discover new bands by actually seeing them play live.

“I don’t know why, but the Germans just don’t seem to have lost that. I don’t really understand the difference in mentality, and it is not just Germany. It is across (mainland) Europe. We have played with some big bands.

“We did a couple of gigs with Slade, and they are still pulling three or four thousand people over there. I don’t know how many people they would get back in the UK… and that was even without Noddy Holder! I despair about it really.

“But at least we have got a story to tell and we are trying to bring that story back to the UK.

“Each time we do a tour here thankfully it is supported by word of mouth and publicity and more and more people get to hear about it.

“It has gone from playing to one man and his dog to playing to more than a hundred people.

“It’s not actually a difficult journey to get into Europe. Our crew come from Poland, and they fly in and we travel out to meet them, and it’s virtually as easy for us to do that as it would be, say, to play in Edinburgh.

“But you always want to be successful in your own country, and that is what we are trying to do.”

The band started in 2004 and turned professional in 2009, getting going properly in 2010.

“Somebody once said that it took ten years to become an overnight success!”

Tim gave up a career in insurance to turn professional musician, so, as he says, it wasn’t a difficult decision.

And no, he doesn’t hanker for his days in insurance.

“You can’t really say that this is a job, to be doing what you love doing for a living. It’s a great thing to do.”

They had to get up early on Boxing Day to fly off for an hour’s gig in Hamburg, but it was worth it.

“You just don’t say no. If you say no, there are always a million more bands behind you! You have got to keep working hard, no matter how long you have been doing it.”