Chichester says farewell to D-Day veteran - 'No better fitting tribute could have been done'

Chichester has said a final farewell to one of its last remaining D-Day veterans

Tuesday, 8th June 2021, 4:21 pm
Updated Tuesday, 8th June 2021, 4:22 pm

Captain Butt, who ran Chichester Army Cadets, died in March aged 95.

On Sunday, the anniversary of D-Day, his friends and members of the Royal Sussex Regimental Association scattered half his ashes round the Canadian oak tree, which the association planted for the Queen’s Jubilee.

The other half of the ashes will travel to the beach in Normandy where Len spent the original D-Day at the age of 19, clearing mines for the allied landings, and where he lost many of his friends.

Captain Butt, who ran Chichester Army Cadets, died in March aged 95

Dave Tilley, regimental association chairman said: "Captain Len Butt landed on the beaches of Normandy 77-years ago at the age of 19 and survived to be a true friend to many and a stalwart in leadership to the youngsters who passed through the Chichester Army Cadets.

"We have said our final farewell to Len on this day being D-Day 77 years to the day.

"No better fitting tribute could have been done for one of Chichester’s last remaining D-Day veterans."

Long-standing city councillor and former mayor Anne Scicluna said the 'lovely and simple' ceremony was completed with two buglers, and followed by the association placing a wreath on the war memorial.

On Sunday, the anniversary of D-Day, Captain Len Butt's friends and members of the Royal Sussex Regimental Association scattered half his ashes round the Canadian oak tree

She added: "Len was a friend to so many of us, and he would be proud that we were able to attend this little ceremony of farewell.

"Some present had been members of the army cadets and learned a great deal from Len and his leadership.

"In addition everyone commented on the marvellous poppies which are in full bloom in the peaceful garden of the oak sculpture. They look superb and a poignant reminder of remembrance in the cause of peace."

The other half of the ashes will travel to the beach in Normandy where Len spent the original D-Day at the age of 19