Star Wars actor's moving tribute to sister actress Sally Bulloch

A Star Wars actor yesterday paid tribute to his late sister who grew up in Bognor Regis.

Jeremy Bulloch, who played Boba Fett in the classic films, described Sally as 'The Special One'. He said: "Nothing was too much trouble for her.

"We loved growing up in Bognor. The sun always seemed to be shining. Growing up by the seaside was just perfect.

"When we were at acting school, and living in digs in London, we always used to look forward to the weekends and going back to Bognor."

He invited all those who knew Sally – who died in South Africa at the age of 59 – to a memorial service to celebrate her life.

This is likely to take place in London on May 16. Final details are still being arranged.

Sally was found dead in the bathroom of her luxury home in Franschhoek, near Cape Town, on April 10. She was cremated in the town. She is believed to have suffered a heart attack and injured herself after falling.

Mr Bulloch said initial reports that her death could have been suspicious were misleading. Verbal comments from the coroner indicated nothing was amiss. But he said the South African system meant it could be months before the verdict was officially known.

Sally, along with her three brothers and sisters, spent much of her childhood and most of her teenage years between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s in Bognor.

Their family had moved from Littlehampton to take over the Fennells social club in Park Road. Sally attended the former Summerley School and Gateway School in Felpham.

She achieved fame as a child actor as Maude Birdhanger in the 1960 film Pure Hell of St Trinian's.

One of her childhood friends in Bognor, Maureen Mabbott, who lived in Stocker Road spoke fondly of the time they spent together from 1956.

"Sally was larger than life. She loved life to the full. Everyone who knew Sally would remember her. She broke all the rules but in a nice way," said Winchester resident Mrs Mabbott, nee McDougall. "There was nothing malicious about her but she was quite fearless.

"You always had fun with her. The only difference between her and her character in the St Trinian's film was that Maude was unpopular and Sally was popular.

"She had such a way with people. That's why she was well-liked."

She kept in contact with Sally, who was due to visit England next month, with regular phone calls.

Paul Watts (59), whose family owned a cafe on Bognor seafront, fondly remembered Sally.

She used to work for him washing up in the former Macari's coffee shop his family took over.

Sally was born at Chatham, Kent, on July 11, 1948. She was the youngest of six children by her mother's second marriage.

Her role in St Trinian's led to parts in television commercials.

But, after she attended the Corona stage school, she became a nanny. A magazine advert led her to work for the late comedian Peter Cook for three years.

A move to Malta saw her host a weekly radio programme before she returned to London in 1976 and applied to work at the Athenaeum Hotel.

She established a reputation there as a superb hostess.

She worked there on and off for 25 years of the almost 30 years she spent in the business in London.