Man who left his mark in Arundel has died

Peter Moss, pictured when he was Arundel deputy mayor, taking on Arun District Council in a row over parking at Arundel Town Hall. Picture: Roger Green
Peter Moss, pictured when he was Arundel deputy mayor, taking on Arun District Council in a row over parking at Arundel Town Hall. Picture: Roger Green

Former Arundel resident Peter Moss is remembered as a man who contributed hugely to the town’s council and community.

Mr Moss, who resigned his seat on Arundel Town Council in November 2013 after he and his wife moved from the area to be nearer their sons in London, has died at the age of 83.

Arundel mayor James Stewart said: “Peter Moss regularly attended council meetings and often asked questions relating both to local issues and council procedure. It was useful for us to have this engagement with members of the public.

“Then in 2007, he stood as a councillor to campaign for the retention of casualty and emergency services at St Richard’s. He rarely missed a meeting and contributed hugely to all council matters until he stood down to move to London.

“Even today, we often ask ‘what would Peter Moss say’ when discussing matters, and this is a fitting tribute to a long-standing Arundel resident and councillor who cared greatly for the town.”

Mr Moss was deputy mayor in 2011 and served on all the town council’s committees. Among his contributions was playing a leading role in the campaign to prevent Arundel Town Hall from being claimed by Arun District Council.

Mr Moss was a Fleet Street journalist before joining the Diplomatic Service in 1966 and spent several years in the Far East, where he was seconded to the South-East Asia Treaty Organisation and worked closely with the governments of Thailand, the Philippines and South Vietnam on counter-insurgency and counter-subversion programmes.

After retiring as a diplomat, he returned to journalism as editor-in-chief of a specialist magazine section at IPC Media.

Mr Moss left Arundel with sadness and regret as he always had a deep love for the town but continued to take an interest in local affairs and returned when he could for special events and to visit friends.