Network Rail warning filmed at Chichester high school

Staff and students at Chichester High School for Boys team up with Network Rail
Staff and students at Chichester High School for Boys team up with Network Rail

A SINGLE moment is all it takes for tragedy to strike.

A teenage girl lies dead on the railway tracks, shortly after leaving school with her friends.

This was the powerful message put across to Chichester students on Tuesday (March 24), as they watched a Network Rail safety film that was shot at their own school.

With numerous students coming into Chichester High School on trains and the city laden with level crossings, the safety message is a vital part of school life.

“The boys’ school is the best school I’ve ever worked with, regarding railway safety messages,” said Nicola Dooris, Network Rail’s community safety manager for Sussex.

She was at the school on Tuesday morning to show a selected group of students the film, entitled No Going Back, and get their feedback.

A still from the Network Rail level crossing safety film, shot at Chichester High School for Boys

A still from the Network Rail level crossing safety film, shot at Chichester High School for Boys

James Taylor, 14, described it as ‘very powerful’ after watching it.

“I think it was definitely the bit where the family were meeting and having food and the father was making a speech about his daughter,” he said.

The film tells the story of a Year 10 girl named Jenny, going through her day and wondering why people cannot see her.

As the hard-hitting film continues, it is revealed she has died on the railway tracks and the film depicts her family and classmates struggling to come to terms with life without her.

Both Adam Kendrick and Connor Cruicks, 14, catch the train to school from Barnham and said the moment where you saw Jenny’s death – not from being silly or careless but from an awful accident on the platform – was especially hard to watch.

“I thought it was different to what I was expecting,” said Adam. “It was different to boys messing about.”

He went on: “The bit that hit hard was when you saw the anti-depressants.”

These were glimpsed in the bathroom when Jenny was walking around her family’s house as a ghost.

“Getting the train every day, I thought it was really powerful,” said Connor, adding the children were standing in little groups, which is what he saw every day.

“I thought that was powerful – it can happen to everyone. It can be a normal day with people walking around.”

James added: “It’s not only the person’s family affected. It can be the train driver and his family that are affected.

“He has no power over what goes on in front of him. It must be a really horrible experience.”

Scenes from the film were shot at Chichester High School for Boys and the film is now getting rolled out across the country to be shown to children and adults alike.