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Linvoy officially opens Foodbank

C140585-1 Bog Jun12 Opening  phot kate                                              Ex Portsmouth payer Linvoy Primus, opened the new Foodbank in Bognor, here with John Madell, from the Bank, and the new mayor of Bognor Tony Gardiner.Picture by Kate Shemilt.C140585-1 SUS-140406-191231001

C140585-1 Bog Jun12 Opening phot kate Ex Portsmouth payer Linvoy Primus, opened the new Foodbank in Bognor, here with John Madell, from the Bank, and the new mayor of Bognor Tony Gardiner.Picture by Kate Shemilt.C140585-1 SUS-140406-191231001

FORMER Pompey player Linvoy Primus has backed the work of the volunteers at the Bognor Regis Foodbank.

Linvoy officially opened the service’s new base in Argyle Road, from which the helpers give out more than 200 food parcels a month.

The FA Cup winner said: “This is about people helping their neighbours. It’s very simple. If there’s a need, let’s meet that need.”

He said going hungry was often the cause of many problems for individuals. The foodbank mirrored a service he helped to start when he played for Portsmouth in the Premier League. He joined with two former players to set up the Faith in Football charity.

“We knew as Christians we really wanted to support the community.

“One of the biggest problems was a lack of food. Kids were leaving home in the morning without having breakfast,” 
he said.

“We decided we would run a breakfast club. It was difficult to start with, with no donations and no people to support us. But the community rallied together and that’s what I see here today. The community is rallying together.”

The ceremony at the Argyle Road premises came three months after the foodbank opened there.

The charity was launched in April 2012 and is one of 400 in the UK overseen by the Trussell Trust.

The Bognor Foodbank is run by the town’s Vineyard and Opengate churches. It was based in the Vineyard offices in Waterloo Square until it outgrew the space.

John Madell, the foodbank’s director and a trustee, said more than 3,000 food parcels had given out since the service’s launch.

The monthly number kept growing. Each parcel contained supplies for three days for individuals or families who were passed on by various agencies for up to three parcels.

“It’s not our intention to support people for ever more,” said Mr Madell. “We try to find out what their underlying problem is and point them in the right direction.”

Support from the public was crucial. Three tons of food was collected recently in three days at Tesco.

 

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