Bognor Regis students get chance to shine at Paralympics

Students at the Regis School who have been chosen to help at the Paralympics. C120028-4
Students at the Regis School who have been chosen to help at the Paralympics. C120028-4

Paralympians are being helped to sporting success by students from The Regis School.

A squad of 16 from the school are playing a major role in helping the international event run smoothly.

Students at the Regis School who have been chosen to help at the Paralympics. C120028-3

Students at the Regis School who have been chosen to help at the Paralympics. C120028-3

The games started on August 29 and will ensure the eyes of the world will once again be on London.

The students’ contribution as Games Makers is centred on the sitting volleyball tournament in the ExCel Centre.

Among those ensuring the games go well is Hester Benham, 18.

“I can’t wait for the Paralympics. It’s going to be an amazing experience. We are going to be in the arena where the Olympic boxing took place. So, there are going to be thousands of seats there,” she said.

“I’m nervous because we will be on the court when there is no play and everyone will be watching us.”

Her role is to act as a mopper to keep the court floor dry. Students will also act as ballboys and girls.

Hester said the training had been comprehensive. “We had three or four stages to go through before we were even selected ahead of the other schools,” she said.

“Since we were told, I’d say we’ve had 50 hours of training, mainly in London.”

Jamie, 18, will be performing an essential role out of sight of the spectators and TV viewers.

He will be based in the athletes’ lounge. “I’ll be getting their water for them, take them to the warm up court and then on to their match.

“Afterwards, I’ll walk them through the press area, get their prosthetic legs for them and make sure the transport is there for them back to the athletes’ village.”

Jamie, whose on track to become a PE teacher, will be working eight shifts over two weeks.

“I’m really looking forward to it, just the whole experience,” he said.

“There’s going to be a real atmosphere with the crowd and it’s going to be good meeting all these international athletes and all the other Games Makers.”

The school’s principal, David Jones, said it had probably had more connection with the games than any other school in the country. As well as the Games Makers, he was one of two members of staff who volunteered at the Olympics and another was a torch bearer.

He said: “The students can only gain from being involved with the teamwork involved, the training involved and the high expectations on them. There is also the experience of being part of an international event. That is something that will not cross their paths very often.”